I’m sorry, you don’t have access to this webpage….

This week I was able to get my students signed onto their blogs for the first time. After spending a fair amount of time setting up an account and blog address for each student last week, I was excited to get them online and choosing a theme and title for their blog. I handed out my Getting Started with Blogging worksheet, everyone logged into their computers, reached the Edublogs website, were given their usernames and passwords, and only about 2/3 of them were able to log in.

“Mrs. Taylor….I don’t see that…I get this message…it tells me I don’t have permission to access the page…I don’t have permission to edit this page…”

giphy7
via GIPHY

Ugh. I went into my “teacher side” of Edublogs and tried to see what was different for those students than the others that were able to log on, I couldn’t figure it out. I started to get stressed, this is why teachers are afraid to do things online in class: what happens if it doesn’t work? Then what? After fiddling with the system for a few minutes (and luckily the rest of my class were busy picking a theme, a very important task) I gave up and decided to email the Edublogs support team for help.

“Okay, I sent an email for help from the company, hopefully, we will be able to get you online tomorrow or later this week, I just can’t seem to figure this out. If you can’t log in, please find someone who could and follow along so that you can see how the blog works. “

I am a big fan of letting students know that teachers are not perfect and that sometimes we struggle with content or in completing things just as they do. I find that it helps students relate to the teacher and know that it is okay to not be successful the first time, that is how we learn. I am a big fan of teaching and being aware of mindset in the classroom.

Now, I have emailed support for various things on various websites in the past. It is not always the most useful approach and I had the intent of calling after class to see if I could talk to someone who might “fix” my issue a little more immediately. I was happily surprised that Edublogs emailed me back in four minutes. FOUR MINUTES. That has to be an all-time record for me!

edublogs support 1
Screenshot of email

As you can see, I had tried to delete and re-add the student accounts. That was not successful. I couldn’t believe how fast I received a response. I quickly sent back the usernames and, even though it was the end of class and 1/3 of my students hadn’t been able to log on, I felt it had been a definite win.

Later that day, I received the following email from Sue Waters:

edublogs support 2

Screenshot of email

I was thrilled. Not only was I able to receive support, it took less than 12 hours to have my issue fixed for me along with the tools to fix it myself if it happened again. I must say, I am happy I chose Edublogs as my platform with this service!

My next class with my Grade 9’s, we were able to all log on (yay!!!), change our blog titles, add category and tag cloud widgets, and make our first post. I modeled the post on my SMARTBoard and all students wrote the same thing but they were excited to get out there and make a post. We even embedded a link to the Saskatchewan Grade 9 Social Studies curriculum page and my students thought it was amazing. (“You can do that? Wow! This is awesome!) This week, I hope to have them finish up the jigsaw activity they have been working on and post their student-made summaries on their blogs.

I also put out a challenge for my students. Each month we complete a current event. I find several new stories and have them answer some questions on the story as a way of interacting with the current headlines and world issues. I have challenged them to complete their Current Event on their blog this month. A few students looked excited so I hope to see some online events!

If you have a moment, check out their blogs, maybe welcome some of my students to the blogging world on their posts or mine, not only will it likely blow their minds someone outside of our classroom commented but I would very much appreciate it!

Mrs. Taylor’s Classroom (Student blogs are down the right sidebar.)

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7 thoughts on “I’m sorry, you don’t have access to this webpage….

  1. I feel for you when things don’t work the way you plan. As teachers it’s terrifying to plan something and then for technology to affect the outcome. Awesome tenacity in seeking support via email. Well done. I am excited to see how this pans out for your students. Way to go on taking this risk with your students.
    PS. I too fell it so essential in letting students know that teachers are not perfect, we dont know everything and we ask for assistance. Team effort. 🙂

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  2. Pingback: Mindful Decluttering and Organizing – A Work in Progress | Coralee Czinkota

  3. tasteach

    Hi Kara,
    I have been using Edublogs now for 10 years blogging with students and teachers. Because they have managers all around the world, you get very quick replies no matter where you live. This is a bonus for when things go wrong. I love the way Sue Waters gives explanations so you can solve the problem yourself next time.

    I run a student blogging challenge with the help of Edublogs if you are interested in checking it out https://studentchallenge.edublogs.org

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    1. Kara

      Thank you for the support, I will definitely check this out! I know that I have increased interest from this group’s English teacher that she may also be interested in using the blogs!

      Like

  4. Pingback: Digital Learning Project: Summary – Kara Taylor's Blog

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