Read, Write, Lead: Breakthrough Strategies for Schoolwide Literacy Success by Regie Routman (Part 1)

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via Goodreads

This summer I have been reading Read, Write, Lead: Breakthrough Strategies for Schoolwide Literacy Success by Regie Routman. This is a required reading for me for my new role as ITC.

Literacy is a word that has always intimidated me. I am a math teacher, my forte is definitely numbers. Teaching students “how to read” is not something that I feel is one of my strengths. Through my teaching career, I have realized that literacy does not just refer to how to see letters and turn them into words, but it is more about comprehension and application of what our students read that is important. This has made me feel more confident in teaching literacy, although I still consider myself far from an expert!

Literacy is about empowering our students to be able to accomplish their goals. I agree with Routman who states “if we just graduate students who have fulfilled requirements but lack curiosity and a desire and ability to be self-sustaining learners, we have failed” (p. 5).

Chapter 1 – Literacy and Leadership: Change that Matters

I love that this book starts with how to prepare a school for change. So much of what I have read in the past provides a lot of really good ideas without providing support and ideas on how to implement them effectively and for the long term.

Routman proposes steps that leaders can take to prepare for change and acknowledges that there are many great ways to implement change in your building. She stresses that relationships with staff and students are pivotal in implementing any type of change in a building and that a positive relationship that starts by focusing on what is done well will provide a strong base for growth when moving on to what can be worked on.

Chapter 2 – Responsive Instruction, Feedback, and Assessment

Routman defines responsive teaching and assessment as “teaching for understanding, continuously checking for understanding, and adjusting instruction as needed” (p. 37). We need to ensure that we are encouraging our students to move towards being more independent learners through effective feedback and planning with the end goal in mind, we often forget to consider what we want our students to be able to do at the end of a lesson or a unit. She also stresses insuring that we include real-world issues as well as skills, such as peer collaboration and active learning, as this increases student performance (p. 41).

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via Middleweb

Using Routman’s Optimal Learning Model (OLM), it is suggested that teachers need to ensure and reflect on the their teaching practice and determine if students are receiving enough of each level. It is also important to shift from part-to-whole teaching to whole-part-whole teaching. This shift involves moving from teaching a small subset of skills, working up to the final product to teaching the final product, addressing subset skills as needed by students. This allows students to demonstrate their prior knowledge as well take charge of their learning by having an image of the goal.

Feedback is another essential portion of the OLM but one of the hardest teaching skills to master. To ensure effective feedback, it must move students’ learning forward positively, be ongoing, and be provided in a timely manner. It is important to remember that feedback is a productive CONVERSATION, not notes written on an assignment and returned.

Reflection

The first two chapters of this book have helped me wrap my head around the idea of literacy as more than just learning how to read and how to start change in a building. I think that this is important for me as I move into two roles that are new to me next year (vice-principal and instructional team coach). It also has me reflecting on my practice as a teacher and where I am in implementing the OLM into my teaching.

I feel that, within the math classroom, I am fairly effective at the OLM as I often (but not always) provide examples I work, that we work, and they work before I assign practice questions for students. In other subjects, I need to work on this. In thinking about the Social 9 course I taught this past year, I could improve my OLM implementation by doing more read-alouds with the the group and explaining how to interpret the features of the textbook, by providing insight into how I decipher words I am not familiar with, and by modelling jot-note taking skills. Although I will not be teaching this course in the upcoming year, I think that these are things that I can implement into the Accounting 10 course I will be teaching in the second semester.

Feedback is an area that I worked on this past year with my school-based Professional Learning Community. We looked at ways to provide feedback at the end of an assessment and looked at a variety of styles of rubrics, talking about what parts we liked, what parts we would like to change, and discussing coming up with a uniform set that are used by all teachers in the school (ie. a rubric for a presentation, poster, etc. that are used by every teacher) so that we can work on the continual growth of those skills. I would like to try a centers-approach in the future to be able to give more immediate feedback and work on the conversation portion of feedback.

Where do you feel you are in implementing the OLM? Do you feel that you are effective at feedback? Where could you improve?

Routman, R. (2014). Read, write, lead: Breakthrough strategies for schoolwide literacy success. ASCD.

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I’m Back!

It has been a while since I have posted but, with new exciting adventures on the horizon, I feel that this is a good motivation for me to get back in the groove!

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I am excited to announce that I have a new position for the 2018-2019 school year! I will be the Vice-Principal at Montmartre School and I am looking forward to this new journey. I will be continuing my role as Career Counsellor in Montmartre School as well have added the role of Instructional Team Coach to my responsibilities.

My new role of Instructional Team Coach (ITC) is what has inspired me to get back into blogging. Being ITC, I will be responsible to coach and support staff in best practice instructional and assessment strategies, collaborate to develop lessons, and integrate 21st Century multiple literacies into the classroom (to name a few things). Professional reading is a pivotal part of this and to help me log and store my thoughts, I want to share what I am reading, what is impacting my beliefs, and what I have further questions about to help me grow as an educator and a leader, especially in literacy, an area that is not firmly rooted in my “comfort zone”.

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Photo Credit: Leo Reynolds Flickr via Compfight cc

On the note of professional reading…what is one book (or a few) that you have read for professional development that made a huge difference for you in terms of changing your teaching beliefs or reinforcing something you already believed? Why was this/these book(s) so pivotal for you? I can’t wait to see your answers!

Digital Learning Project: Summary

This term I decided to start blogging with my Social 9 class for my digital learning project. I have had several posts throughout the term about my trials, tribulations, and successes with the project:

Time for Social Media! – First post, and my first ideas.

Third Time’s the Charm – Finalization of my decision to start blogging with my class.

Blogging about Blogs – Background work to starting blogging such as parent letters and organizing how I want the project to look.

Setting the Stage – Setting up student blogs and getting going on how to use Edublogs.

I’m sorry, you don’t have access to this webpage…. – Getting students online and troubleshooting issues.

Making International Connections! – Our first posts AND comments!

Inserting Pictures, Copyright and Copyleft, and some Free Write Time! – Learning about Copyright and the Creative Commons. Also, our first pictures in our posts.

I would also like to show off my classroom blog. My posts are pretty boring as they mostly constitute the assignments for the class but some of my students did a really good job and really embraced the process.

I have had an amazing time with this project and intend to continue its use. I feel that, at times, I was really pushing my students to work on the blog in an inorganic way so that I could talk about what we were doing in class for this project. I look forward to being a little less pushy moving forward, using it more as an option for how to submit assignments as opposed to a “YOU MUST DO THIS” as I had a few students who really did not enjoy the process.

I made blogging with this class a part of my Professional Goals I submitted to my division so that I am encouraged (and feel obligated) to continue the project throughout the year. I can’t wait to see where this takes me as I have wanted to start blogging with a class for a long time but could never actually get to the point where it was set up and ready to go.

Thanks for a great class and I look forward to creeping in and learning about Digital Citizenship and Media Literacies on EC&I 832 posts next term!

 

Meet my new BFF: Padlet!

This week I was excited to find and review an application or tool that I had not previously used. I liked a lot of the tools that we talked about but realized that my entire experience with Padlet was to post my intro picture for #eci831 and #eci834 but that I had never truly spent time discovering what the tool was capable of. I was also inspired by my former classmate Megan from #eci834 who retweeted another’s use of Padlet on Twitter. So…here goes.

Account

When signing up for Padlet there were a few different options: You can sign up for an account with your Google account, your Facebook account, or via email. I like this as I have enough different passwords and usernames to remember, linking this to my Google account is easy and I can (and have) created a Google account that I use primarily for my school-based work and bookmarks so this is very convenient. Add the self-esteem boosting mandatory “click this box” portion of signing up, and who could be upset???

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Screenshot of signup page for Padlet (and a great pick-me-up!)

Dashboard

The dashboard is simple and easy to follow. I like that there is a space for Recent activity for if you are sharing your Padlet with others so that you can see any updates that have occurred. Overall, it is exactly what I would expect from such a page to help organize your different pages.

Create

This is where I feel Padlet really shines. They have generic blank templates that you can use and they also have more stylized templates to help you come up with ideas. I right away started with the stylized templates to see what Padlet is capable of. Their premade templates include a Moodboard, Bookmarks, Q&A, Kanban Board, KWL Chart, Video Playlist, Storyboard, Organization chart and a space to request a specific type of template. Each of these has a Preview option to help create ideas of how the tool can be used. After reviewing each and playing with the different styles, I decided to create my own Padlet.

I decided to follow the lines of the example above and create a grid-style Padlet. We are moving to a new unit in my Social 9 class right this week and I thought this may be a great way to collect some resources. I started by choosing a background and coming up with column headings. For now, I chose to be the only one who can edit the Padlet, given my intention of its use. Then I started to collect some (rather random) resources. As soon as I started to input information, I knew that I liked this tool.

 

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Screenshot of my Egypt and Mesopotamia Padlet

 

I loved that you can provide links, you can watch videos right on the Padlet screen or move to the hosting website, you can drag and drop for reordering items on the board. The tool is very user-friendly and allows for a lot of personalization. I could easily see how I could plan activities and lessons on Padlet and share resources and links easily with my class. I invite you to check out my Padlet and play with the videos and see how easily you can navigate the board!

Strengths

In terms of strengths, I feel that Padlet is a great tool. In fact, I was very happily sharing it with my colleagues today after school and they were excited with how easy it was to use. The easy way to add (or subtract) items from the board, to move them around, and to share with others is great. If you were to collaborate with others, you can easily add to the board from Android and Apple apps on your phone or desktop versions including a Chrome extension and Chrome app. There are paid versions for relatively reasonable prices for educators and for businesses. “Backpack” (school) accounts allow for unlimited students under a teacher account.

The supports for schools are actually quite impressive: they integrate with Google apps and LMS, they have better privacy and security options, and they will even send you a hand-written love letter to thank you! They are also working on analytics and content filtering so it seems they are continuing to develop the platform.

Probably most impressive is their refund policy. I have never seen ANY refund policy that is as customer-centered as this one. You seriously need to check it out. They will do back-refunds and work with you to ensure you are happy if the tool does not meet your needs (or if you just stop using it)!

 

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Weaknesses

There is a bit of restriction on the free account in the limit of 4 Padlets and the limit in options but, as it is quite affordable if you are going to use it regularly, I feel that this can be avoided. I guess you could also create multiple accounts but then you would need to remember multiple usernames and passwords and I am not good at that on the best of days…..

Given that a paid teacher account allows for unlimited students, teachers that team teach content or students may be able to collaborate on one account if they wanted or needed to save on costs to the school or teacher wallet, I could not find Terms of Service that said this was not allowed but I may not be correct on this.

Potential

This is something that I think I would use for planning primarily. I can see myself using it much as my demo board is set up, to help guide an inquiry-based unit or project, or to collaborate with other teachers to share resources and links. In talking about sharing in previous posts, I feel that I may have solved my dilemma of how to organize, share, and collaborate with others, I really like the visual but organized flow of this tool. This is a tool that I will be using in the future.

Another fun fact is that there is a plugin for Padlet on WordPress (if you host your own site) where you can embed a Padlet in your post, something that I find very interesting! Now, I think I may be fully convinced: I may just have to get my own domain! (I need to figure out how first though…. anyone know how to go about that?)

Have you ever used Padlet? If so, how did you like it? Would you use it again? If you have a moment to pay around with it, do you agree with my assessment of it? I would love to hear from you!

If you aren’t sharing, you aren’t truly teaching

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I want to start my post this week with a true story about how sharing has helped me. I used to carry all of my teaching files back and forth between school and home on an external hard drive. A couple of years ago I arrived at school in January and plugged my trusty drive into my laptop at school to find…..nothing. Nothing at all. I tried not to panic and quickly headed home (a mere 7 blocks) to plug it back into my home computer, I must have just unplugged it without “removing safely” and I would definitely be able to access my files at home still. Unfortunately, I arrived at home and again…nothing. I was ready to cry. I demanded of my husband he was to take my drive to Regina (2 hours away), find a good tech person, and have them recover my files. I specifically remember telling him I didn’t care how much it cost him. I was 2 weeks away from the end of my semester, I was finishing making my final exams, and I did not want to start from scratch. I considered quitting if my files were all gone.

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I headed back to school with intense anxiety. I went to my teacher friends and shared my life-shattering morning and that is when my passion for sharing came in handy. I had completely forgotten that at the beginning of the year I had a “sharing party” with several of my colleagues and we had shared all of our teaching files back and forth. I hadn’t lost EVERYTHING, just some of the newer files and some of the edits I had made during the past semester. Even though it wasn’t all of the files I had been looking for to work off of to edit my final exams, I had the majority of what I wanted. Because I was willing to share my resources, it actually came back to help me when I lost everything.

Sharing. It is one of the first social skills that we learn and probably one of the first that we fail at as well. So much of our world and our society is built on the sharing of resources, ideas, and skills, its impossible to imagine our world without it.

Steven Johnson talks about Where Good Ideas Come From, describing the beginning of the Enlightenment which occurred in coffee shops to the development of GPS as a side curiosity of two scientists. Johnson’s talk really appealed to me: I like coffee, I love hanging out in coffee shops, and history is of great interest to me. This is all great but what was most interesting was his opinion that we need to spend time connecting our ideas instead of always just protecting them.

Sharing is my way of life in education. I made a video that describes how I use sharing in my everyday teaching and life.

As mentioned in the video, one of my favourite types of professional development is to sit in a room of educators with a common subject area or group of students and talk. Talk about lesson ideas, behaviour ideas, education ideas. I always leave these sessions feeling energized and excited to go back to my students and implement the ideas that I have gained or shared in creating.

Not everyone is as enthusiastic to share their ideas, many people are afraid that they will be judged or that their work is not “good enough” to be shared with others. This is where Derek Sivers‘ video Obvious to You: Amazing to Others is imperative and meets with Johnson’s talk. If we do not share our ideas with others, even if they are not fully formed yet, we are not able to continue our personal growth and realization. This can be even more difficult in a society where everything that you put online is there forever and searchable. This is why the culture of sharing, adapting, and remixing is important to develop. Many teachers and educators are ready and willing to share and start this revolution, in fact, many of them already have, but there are many who do not know HOW.

Finding a platform to share what I have created is one of my biggest barriers. I have tried many different platforms and have not fully been happy with any of them but, as mentioned in my video, I feel that has more to do with my perceived lack of connection to others and I need to work on ensuring that I am still putting myself out there. I believe that this is also one of the things that is a barrier to creating the culture of sharing online as so many people are not sure HOW to share their work and so they don’t, they end up hoarding it, not because they want to, but because they do not know how to put it out to the online world.

What types of platforms have you used to share your work? Do you find that some platforms are better than others? In what ways can you support your colleagues in learning to share online?

To finish my hard drive dilemma, apparently, they are definitely not made to be hauled around in a teacher bag…they are not that durable. And, The Computer Clinic in Regina saved me and (for a very reasonable price) they were able to retrieve all of my files!

**Sorry this is a little late…I am having issues with my internet this week…ugh.

Inserting Pictures, Copyright and Copyleft, and some Free Write Time!

This week on our blogs, we learned about inserting pictures, giving attribution, and we had a work period to catch up on posts and write an optional “free write post” for those that are all caught up.

We started our pictures lesson with a discussion about copyright and the creative commons. We talked about how everything is copyright by default and discussed why this is the way our society worked. We discussed Napster and I realized how long it has been since Napster was a thing as none of my Grade 9s  had even heard of the file-sharing site! We watched the first few minutes of the video of Metallica‘s Lars Ulrich speaking at the Senate Committee and discussed why he felt so passionately about his stance.

Once we had a good idea of copyright and the rules around it, we talked about copyleft and the creative commons. I showed them the different licenses that the creative commons website can help users hold and what each of the different parts means (such as non-commercial, attribution, share-alike) and why some internet users decide to allow others to use their materials. We then went looking for pictures to post!

I had all of my students use Compfight for their images and we learned out to insert an image of their choice into a blog post and use the caption area of the image to put in the photo credit. I also had students define copyright and copyleft on their posts so that I could check for understanding. When I was going over their submitted posts to publish them, however, I found that some had “copy and pasted” a definition of each of these two words into their post….I am going to have to have another conversation about using one’s own work next week, and not copying off of others.

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Screenshot of Google Images tools

I also briefly showed my students the search tools on Google Images. On this, you can search for different usage rights on images. I have used this in the past when I find that Compfight is not bringing up what I am looking for but I did stress that Compfight is a little easier as it is better stream-lined (in my opinion) and relatively user-friendly.

Once we were done images, students were able to work on their Current Event, catch up on other posts, or write about something that they were interested in. This gave me time to go around and help some students more one-on-one with using the Edublogs platform and fix up any posts that they either hadn’t submitted or that I would like them to make some edits to. I encouraged my student that, now that we know how to link to other websites and insert pictures with attribution, they should be integrating these skills into their future posts.

This week, we will be starting a research project on First Nations locations in the prairie provinces. They will be required to insert pictures into their posts and link to their sources…I can’t wait to see the results!